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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

THE BULLETIN 



of the 



Nort-h Carolina Department- of Agriculture 



L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 



Number 155 



April 1959 



North CaroZ/nO' 
Deparfment of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
John L. Reitzel, Assistant Commissioner 



State Board of Agriculture 

J. Atwell Alexander Stony Point 

W. I. BiSSETTE Grifton 

Glenn G. Gilmore Julian 

HOYLE C. Griffin Monroe 

Claude T. Hall Roxboro 

George P. Kittrell Corapeake 

J. Muse McCotter New Bern 

Charles F. Phillips Thomasville 

J. H. Poole West End 

A. B. Slagle Franklin 



, CONTENTS 

Page 

Tobacco Outlook for 1959 5 

Growers Take Heed 9 

State Summary 1958-59 13 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales 

Report for Season 1958-59 16 

Summary of Dealer and Warehouse 

Resales 1958-59 18 

Producer and Gross Sales of Flue-Cured 

Tobacco by States 1958 18 

Stabilization Receipts by Belts 1958 18 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 1919-1958 19 

North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1958 20 

North Carolina Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 1959 21 

North Carolina Burley Tobacco Allotments 23 

North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses and Operators 

by Belts and Markets 1958 24 

Domestic Cigarette Consumption 

by Kinds 1958 Back Cover 

Cover: Ship Loading at a North Carolina Port. 

Photo: Courtesy North Carolina Ports Authority. 






FOREWORD 

This tenth annual issue of the Tobacco Report has 
been compiled and prepared by W. P. Hedrick and 
J, H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists with the Division of 
Markets, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture under the Research and Marketing Act. 

Credit is due the Cooperative Crop Reporting 
Service of the North Carolina and United States De- 
partments of Agriculture, and the Tobacco Branch of 
the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service for much 
of the statistical data contained herein. 

This issue of the Tobacco Report is dedicated to 
export leaf dealers, who use North Carolina ports for 
shipping tobacco to all countries of the world. 




Commissi07ier of Agriculture 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Section, 
Markets Division, North Carolina Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



A 5 9 - 6 M 



Tobacco Outlook 1959 

In the past, the tobacco industry has been a business in which 
there was little readiness to speak with a single voice. During 
1958 many changes have taken place in this attitude. Industry 
development during the year included the organization of the 
Tobacco Institute and the continuation of the Tobacco Industry 
Research Committee's support of impartial research into tobacco 
use and health. The Tobacco Tax Council will continue to fight 
taxes on tobacco products at all levels of government — federal, 
state, county and municipal. Also of importance was the forma- 
tion of Tobacco Growers Information Committee, a grass-roots 
type of organization to work on behalf of tobacco growers in 
the production areas. 

In North Carolina the role of tobacco in the economy of the 
state is enormous. About 44 per cent of our cash farm income is 
derived from tobacco and 58 per cent of the total number of 
cigarettes made in the United States are manufactured within 
our borders. 

Tobacco growers in the state are supporting members of the 
above named organizations and future attacks on the tobacco 
industry will be answered in one loud resounding voice. 

Record consumption of 424 billion cigarettes in 1958 clearly 
spells out public acceptance of an important product that 160,- 
000 to 175,000 farm families depend on for food, clothing and 
shelter. 

The referendum vote on continued acreage control for the 
next three years clearly shows that growers are truly concerned 
over the supply and demand situation of flue-cured tobacco. To- 
bacco growers already feeling the pinch from acreage cuts in 
the past, have expressed their willingness to accept a revision 
in the parity formula which forces tobacco prices up as prices 
for other farm commodities go down. 

They have also agreed to a ten-fold increase in the acreage as- 
sessment paid to Tobacco Associates, Inc. to permit aggressive 
promotion of the export market as well as wage war against 
enemies of tobacco in the United States. 

The battle for the world's tobacco markets is now at a serious 
stage. Competition from other leaf growing areas of the world 
has ruled out any chance for North Carolina growers to com- 
pete as far as price is concerned. Our growers are losing part 
of their market to Rhodesia, Japan and India. 



Production of Flue Cured Tobacco in Certain 
Competitive Countries of World 1958 

1957 1958 



Canada 150 Million 161 Million 

Rhodesia 149 " 156 " 

Brazil 74 " 103 " 

Philippines 59 " 70 " 

Korea 35 " 40 " 

Australian 10 " 12 

Decreases in production were shown in Japan, India and Venezuela. 

The average cost of producing an acre of tobacco in Southern 
Rhodesia during the 1957 season was equivalent to U. S. $276, 
according to the Minister of Agriculture. With an average yield 
of 811 pounds of leaf per acre, it cost about U, S. 34 cents to 
produce a pound of leaf. Native labor cost about $20 per month, 
with overhead (capitalization costs) about 24 per cent. 

A recent survey took a representative sample of registered 
growers in Rhodesia with an average of 68 acres per farm. 
Figures show that growers with yields per acre of 1,000 pounds 
or more spent 29 cents per pound on production and marketing 
costs, while growers with yields below 600 pounds per acre spent 
41 cents. 

Another reason for this loss of exports is that some of our 
growers are producing a type of leaf the foreign market does 
not want. Since the price of our tobacco is higher than leaf 
grown in competitive countries it is necessary for our growers 
to concentrate on quality. Our growers can and will overcome this 
obstacle. North Carolina has the soil, climate, and cultural know- 
how to produce the finest tobacco in the world. 

Probably the greatest threat to the future prosperity of the 
tobacco industry in North Carolina is the ever mounting taxes 
on cigarettes. 

It is reasonable to forecast that, unless the present cigarette 
tax policy is reversed, at some future date cigarette taxes will 
show diminishing returns to the taxing agencies and the resulting 
smaller demand for tobacco by manufacturers will force further 
acreage cuts. 

As for the immediate future, 1959 total production should be 
about the same as for the 1958 season. 

On December 15th growers approved marketing quotas for 
the next three crops. Flue-cured acreage allotments for 1959 
are essentially the same as 1958 and 1957, when 712 thousand 
acres were allotted to tobacco. 



The Soil Bank acreage reserve program, which was in op- 
eration during the past three crop seasons will not be in effect 
in 1959. Therefore, 66,000 acres will be returned to production. 

Last season with almost perfect growing conditions growers 
produced 1,078 million pounds, for a yield of 1,690 pounds per 
acre. A per acre yield of this size can hardly be expected in 
1959. However, the return to production of the soil bank acreage 
should produce about 1,100 million pounds or a slight increase 
over 1958. 

The total supply of flue-cured is 3,386 million pounds, down 
200 million pounds in carry-over from the mid 1958 level. 

In spite of the improved position in total supply stocks, the 
Flue-cured Tobacco Cooperative Stabilization had in storage 680 
million pounds received from the price support program. 

It can be assumed from the fact that 145 million pounds was 
received by the Stabilization Corporation that domestic com- 
panies are no longer allowing tobacco the traditional 21/2 to 
three years ageing period. Another factor affecting the amount 
placed under loan could be the quality deterioration or hesitancy 
of foreign manufacturers to buy our leaf at present prices. 




Stabilization stocks were at a record level of 680 million pounds on January 
1, 1959. 



For the past four years the use of flue-cured has shown a de- 
crease, reaching a low of 705 million in 1956. The trend now in 
usings is on the increase. It is expected that 765 million will be 
used in 1959. The increase is attributable to a gain in cigarettes 
manufactured. 

Exports of flue-cured in 1959 are expected to be about the 
same as 1958 when 445 million pounds was bought by foreign 
manufacturers. 

Two factors primarily have favored exports: (1) substantial 
gains in cigarette consumption, particularly in Western Europe. 
(2) Smaller supplies of certain grades available from Rhodesia 
and Canada. 

Normally foreign buyers take tobaccos from the leaf grades, 
usually those exported are the medium and heavier-bodied grades, 
with some from the nondescript group. 

The B4, B5 and B6's are generally the grades preferred by the 
export trade. The predominance of the B group as export grades 
is due not only to the fact that it usually makes up about half 
or more of the flue-cured crop but also, to the desire abroad for 
flavor and aroma. 

Foreign buyers can secure more flavor and aroma from 
U. S. flue-cured per dollar than from neutral tobaccos bought 
from competitive countries regardless of price. 

The action of the United Kingdom, West Germany, Belgium, 
and the Scandinavian Countries in making their currencies 
externally convertible will have important effects on the promo- 
tion of flue-cured sales. 

The 1959 price outlook will be influenced to some extent by 
any legislation that may be passed by Congress during the 
present session. 

Under existing law, the 1959 crop must be supported at 90 
per cent of parity, since a marketing quota will be in effect. 
The adjusted base price for calculating parity for 1959 will be 
higher than last year. Therefore, the 90 per cent parity support 
price will be about two cents higher than in 1958. With a support 
price of 56.6 cents per pound, the season average price should 
be about $60.00 per hundred pounds. 



Growers Take Heed 

In making plans for the 1959 crop, growers should take heed 
of the current situation, and not base their decision on what a 
farmer can get by with at the market or what he can dump into 
the stabilization pool. Instead, tobacco growers should con- 
centrate their efforts on practices that will place upon the ware- 
house floor the quality of tobacco that once made our tobacco 
superior to all other flue cured tobacco in the world. The time 
has come when each individual farmer should look farther than 
the small short-term gains made by producing tonnage of to- 
bacco, which often contains tobacco that clog up the channels 
of trade. Growers should plan their farm business on a long- 
range basis with a well handled quality product as the goal, 
so as to regain the respect and confidence of the world market. 
The United States, with its standard of living, cannot compete 
with foreign countries in the price of flue cured tobacco, but 
we can excell them in quality. 

Stafements from Foreign Markets 

In recent years foreign markets have been very concerned 
about the deterioration of quality and the continuous increase 
in price of U. S. flue cured tobacco. In many foreign countries 
artificial flavorings in cigarettes are not permitted, so U. S. flue 
cured tobacco is used as a concentrate in the cigarette blend 
of those countries, to add natural flavor and aroma to the 
neutral foreign grown tobacco. Therefore, our export grades 
of flue cured tobacco must have a rich flavor and aroma to be 
acceptable to the foreign trade. 

The following are quotations from several buying companies 
in foreign countries concerning U. S. flue cured tobacco : 

"The matter of quality of American tobacco is a very impor- 
tant one and I was, therefore, very glad to read that the neces- 
sary steps are being taken to ensure its continuation for the 
future. After all, the quality and flavor we look for in American 
tobaccos have become our main incentive for buying our require- 
ments over there, particularly, since we gradually had to reduce 
our purchases these last years on account of the ever increasing 
prices. Since the increase of price supports for the 1958 crop, 
the quantities ordered by our European affiliated Companies this 
year came down again." 



"I think that the stabiHzation of U. S. tobacco prices would 
certainly be a big help for exporting U. S. leaf, because it will 
enable the manufacturer to keep his present proportion of U. S. 
leaf in his blend instead of being forced to reduce this proportion 
constantly, and to replace it by substitutes with more reasonable 
prices. Besides the eflfect of stabilization of prices, you must 
naturally always consider the buying policy of the American 
manufacturers who suddenly, owing to changes in the taste of 
the American smokers, jumped on certain types of tobacco which 
formerly could be bought at reasonable prices by the export 
trade, and thus driving them sky-high." 

"As far as we can see, the policy of your farmers is successful 
regarding the supply of your domestic industry. But they are 
killing your export business, not only on account of the high 
prices, but also on account of their bad quality and sorting. 
During many years, your farmers were told that their Burley 
and Bright Virginia (flue cured) were the best of the world and 
this was correct. But since a few years, the quality dropped so 
low, that this is no more an axiom. This is a point they ought 
to know." 

The above quotations from foreign markets are representative 
of the general complaints made against U. S. tobacco by the ex- 
port trade. The major complaints as quoted above are in connec- 
tion with prices, qucditij and the poor job of farm sorting on 
export grades. The farmer can help improve two of these prob- 
lems by concentrating more on quality, and by doing a better 
job of farm sorting. 

Preparafion for Market 

During the last several years many farmers have become very 
lax in their practices of preparing tobacco for market. The main 
reason why this situation has developed is because most domes- 
tic buyers have overlooked the poor job of sorting, and have 
paid farmers good prices for unsorted tobacco. This has en- 
couraged many farmers not to do much sorting on any of their 
tobacco, including the export grades, and that is causing major 
concern in the export market at the present time. 

We realize that the job of sorting tobacco into uniform grades 
is an expensive one, and if the domestic companies can use their 
grades of tobacco without too much sorting as they have in- 
dicated, then that is well and good. But, we should realize that 

10 



we are not competing with a foreign country in our domestic 
market yet, while our competition from foreign countries for ex- 
port grades is increasing year after year. Therefore, in order 
to meet this foreign competition, it is imperative that we do at 
least as good a job in sorting our tobacco into uniform grades, 
as foreign growers are doing. 

How big a job is it to get tobacco into fairly uniform grades? 
Too many tobacco farmers have the idea that one has to know 
the specifications for most of the standard grades in order to 
sort tobacco into uniform grades, but this is not necessarily 
true. The minimum requirement is to be able to recognize the 
basic groups of tobacco which are the priming, lug, cutter and 
leaf groups. 

After recognition of groups is accomplished, the job of sorting 
tobacco into grades that will meet the minimum market demand 
is relatively simple. First, all dead, green, or off-color tobacco 
should be separated out of each barn of tobacco. 

Next in the barns making up the leaf group, or tobacco coming 
from the upper half of the plant, a step further should be taken 
to separating these barns of tobacco according to length. There 
are three major lengths in the leaf groups ; they are long leaf, 
medium length leaf, and tips. 




Picture at left shows two bundles of mixed leaf tobacco as they were picked 
up from basket on warehouse floor. 

Picture at the right shows the same two bundles of tobacco sorted out 
into uniform grades by separating into two lengths. 



n 



When these length categories are applied to barns of leaf 
tobacco from individual crops, it will result in fairly uniform 
grades. In other words, the tobacco in each category will be fairly 
uniform in length, quality, and blend in color after green and 
off-color leaves have been removed. Therefore, the practice of 
separating leaf barns of tobacco according to length, and at the 
same time remove any green, dead, or off-color tobacco, will get 
each grade of leaf tobacco uniform enough so that it will meet 
the specifications of the U. S. Standard grades, as well as the 
requirements of the export trade. 

There is one other practice that should not be overlooked in 
preparing tobacco for market, and that is the removal of all 
strings and foreign matter from the tobacco. There are many 
cases where farmers have outstanding quality in their crop when 
it comes from the curing barn, but due to poor market prepara- 
tion the quality does not stand out, and quite often the full value 
of the tobacco is not realized. 

The Tobacco Section of the North Carolina Department of 
Agriculture, through a long range service program, has been 
working with organized farm groups to help them improve their 
practices of preparing tobacco for market, and to assist them in 
applying simplified methods of farm sorting so as to get the 
grades uniform enough to meet the requirements of the require- 
ments of the U. S. Standard grades and market demand. This 
service will be continued and intensified in an effort to help 
farmers do a better job of farm sorting their tobacco. 



12 



State Summary 1958-59 

The state farm income from flue cured tobacco made a come- 
back in 1958, due to record high yields per acre, and a record 
high market average for the crop. 

North Carolina burley growers also did well during the 1958 
season, with a new record average price being paid for the high 
yields from the 1958 crop. 

Producer sales, on the 44 flue cured markets operating in the 
state in 1958, returned the growers $418,226,008 for the 719,- 
148,970 pounds sold which is a record average of $58.16 per 
hundred. In 1957 flue cured tobacco growers sold 633,700,390 
pounds on North Carolina markets for $350,966,656 which was 
an average of $55.38 per hundred. The average price in 1958 
showed an increase of $2.78 per hundred, and the dollar value 
increased $67,259,352 over the previous year. 

Type 13 — The 1958 auction season began on the eight North 
Carolina Border Belt markets on August 5th. The quality of the 
crop was slightly inferior to the 1957 crop, but most grade prices 
were at record high levels. Price increases ranged from $1.00 to 
$14.00 per hundred. The biggest gains were in the medium to 
low grades of lugs and primings, and best thin nondescript. 
However, price declines of $1.00 to $4.00 were noted on several 
low quality leaf grades, mostly on the variegated and green side. 

Season sales by growers selling on the N. C. Border markets 
reached 125,468,940 pounds, returning growers $75,706,287, for 
a record season average of $60.34 per hundred. In 1957 growers 
received $67,383,608 for 112,998,465 pounds, averaging $59.63 
per hundred. The marketing season ended in this belt on 
October 2, for a season of 42 sale days, which is the same length 
as the 1957 season. 

Type 12 — The 17 Eastern Belt markets opened for the 1958 
season on August 21, which was a week later than the opening 
date the previous year. The quality of offerings were slightly 
lower than the previous year, due mostly to more immature 
tobacco showing up. However, the Eastern crop brought the 
highest average price in the history of the belt. Most grade 
averages showed an increase ranging from $1.00 to $11.00 per 

13 



hundred over the 1957 level, with only a few losses occurring 
mostly in green leaf grades. 

Eastern farmers received $213,974,401 for 370,772,702 pounds, 
which was a record season average of $57.71 per hundred. In 
1957 farmers in this belt received $173,876,613 for 317,359,121 
pounds, averaging $54.79 per hundred. 

The Eastern Belt season consisting of 59 sale days ended on 
November 13. In 1957 the season covered a period of 61 sale 
days. 

Type 1 IB— The 10 Middle Belt markets opened for the 1958 
season on September 4. The quality showed some improvement 
in this belt over the previous year. Many of the grade prices 
showed increases ranging up to $11.00 per hundred above the 
1957 level. The largest gains occurred in the medium and low 
quality lugs and primings, while lemon and green leaf showed 
the smallest gains. 

Growers in this belt also received a record average of $57.86 
for their 1958 offerings of 124,296,176 pounds, which returned 
them $71,921,534. In 1957 producer sales amounted to 111,212,- 
560 pounds, which sold for $59,552,006, giving them a 1957 
average $53.55 per hundred. 

The Middle Belt held final sales of the season on November 21, 
after operating for 56 sale days, as compared with 61 days in 
1957. 

Type 11 A — The 1958 opening of the nine North Carolina Old 
Belt markets was on September 15, which was about a week 
later than the 1957 opening. The Old Belt followed the trend 
established by the early belts of setting a new record market 
average. Grade averages showed gains ranging from $1.00 to 
$12.00 per hundred. A large majority of the grade averages were 
higher than the previous year. The only losses occurring were 
for a few grades of red and green leaf. 

Producer sales on the North Carolina Old Belt markets rose 
to 98,611,152 pounds, returning to the growers $56,623,786, 
which is a record average of $57.42 per hundred for the 1958 
season. In 1957 producer sales averaged $54.51 per hundred 
for 92,130,244 pounds, which sold for $50,154,429. 

The North Carolina Old Belt markets held final sales Decem- 
ber 12, for a season of 63 sale days, compared to 62 sale days 
in 1957. 



14 



Type 31 — The North Carolina Burley markets at Asheville, 
Boone and West Jefferson opened for the 1958-59 season on 
November 24. The crop in general was thinner bodied than the 
1957 crop, which made it a slightly better smoking crop. Most 
grade prices showed increases over the previous year, which 
resulted in a new record high market average. Only about 1% 
of the offerings went into the pool under the loan program. 

Burley growers sold 16,843,834 pounds on North Carolina 
markets during the 1958-59 season. They received $10,851,546 for 
their offerings, which gave them a record average of $64.42 
per hundred. During the 1957-58 season Burley growers re- 
ceived $9,774,301 for 16,746,334 pounds, averaging $58.37 per 
hundred. 

Season Burley sales in North Carolina were completed on 
January 15, 1959, covering 28 sale days, compared with 32 
days during the previous year. 



15 



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Summary of N.C. Dealer and Warehouse 
Resoles 1958-1959 











Percentage 


Belt 


Pounds 


Dollars 


Ave. Price 


Resales 


Border Belt- 










Dealer 


4,150.598 


S 1.944,474 


$46.85 


3.0 


Warehouse 


9,369,267 


5,331,888 


56.91 


6.7 


Eastern Belt- 










Dealer 


10,011,131 


4,391,535 


43.87 


2.5 


Warehouse 


20,578,512 


10.967,209 


53.29 


5.1 


Middle Belt- 










Dealer 


4,721,610 


2.009.008 


42.55 


3.4 


Warehouse 


8.200,424 


4.448,678 


54.25 


6.0 


Old Belt- 










Dealer 


3,825,146 


1,757,215 


45.94 


3.4 


Warehouse 


8,788,804 


4,909,788 


55.86 


7.9 


Burlev Belt- 










Dealer 


395,168 


234.835 


59.43 


2.1 


Warehouse 


1,575,334 


985,766 


62.58 


8.4 



Producer and Gross Soles of Flue-Cured 
Tobacco by Staf-es-1958 



Producer Sales 



Pounds 



Ave. Price 



N. C 719.148,970 

Va 129,223.064 

S. C 110.366,481 

Ga 106,891,560 

Fla 14,543,541 

TOTAL 1,080,173,616 



$58.15 
57.87 
59.98 
57.57 
57.27 

.$58.24 



Gross Sales 



Pounds 



788,794,462 
138,978,243 
124,066,651 
117,422.460 
16.622,398 

1.185,884,214 



Ave. Price 



$57.55 
57.52 
59.43 
57.16 
57.18 

$57.70 



Stabilization Receipts by Belts-1958 



Belt 



Type 



Producer Sales 
(Pounds) 



Stabilization 
Receipts (lbs.) 



Percentage 
Stab. Received 



Old Belt 11 A 

Middle Belt 11 B 

Eastern Belt 12 

Border Belt 13 

Ga.-Fla. Belt 14 

TOTAL 11-14 



227,834,216 


41,205,622 


18.09 


124,296,176 


15,693,466 


12.63 


370,772,702 


49.960,406 


13.47 


235,835,421 


35,559,252 


15.08 


121,435,101 


2.425,688 


2.00 


1.080,173,616 


144,844,434 


13.41 



North Carolina Flue-Cured Crops 
1919-1958 







Yield Per 








Year 


No. Acres 


Acre 


Production 


Value 


Average 






(Pounds) 


(1,000 lbs.) 


(1,000 Dollars) 


Price 


1919 


521,500 


612 


319,276 


$157,340 


$49.30 


1920 


621,900 


681 


423,703 


88,271 


20.80 


1921 


414,900 


594 


246,540 


60,402 


24.50 


1922 


444,000 


611 


271,170 


74,572 


27.50 


1923 


544,300 


728 


396,354 


81,998 


20.70 


1924 


473,500 


585 


276,819 


62,597 


22.60 


1925 


536,200 


696 


373,352 


83,756 


22.40 


1926 


546,700 


692 


378,274 


96,762 


25.60 


1927 


639,600 


755 


482,982 


100,414 


20.80 


1928 


712,400 


692 


493,132 


93,450 


19.00 


1929 


729,300 


665 


484,630 


89,470 


18.50 


1930 


768,000 


757 


581,200 


74,733 


12.90 


1931 


688,500 


692 


476,382 


42,024 


8.80 


1932 


462,500 


624 


288,750 


34,949 


12.10 


1933 


667,800 


794 


530,133 


85,530 


16.10 


1934 


486,500 


847 


412,055 


117,999 


28.60 


1935 


612,500 


635 


572,625 


116,418 


20.30 


1936 


591,000 


765 


451,975 


101,856 


22.50 


1937 


675,000 


883 


595,815 


143,058 


24.00 


1938 


603,500 


844 


509,470 


115,428 


22.70 


1939 


843,000 


964 


812,540 


123,893 


15.20 


1940 


498,000 


1,038 


516,835 


85,792 


16.60 


1941 


488,000 


928 


452,825 


132,291 


29.20 


1942 


539,000 


1,052 


566,810 


221,538 


39.10 


1943 


580,000 


935 


542,200 


219,074 


40.40 


1944 


684,000 


1,077 


736,990 


317,628 


43.10 


1945 


722,000 


1,100 


794,310 


349,148 


44.00 


1946 


802,000 


1,138 


912,970 


451,639 


49.50 


1947 


783,000 


1,139 


892,205 


374,513 


42.00 


1948 


594,000 


1,239 


739,380 


368,040 


49.80 


1949 


621,000 


1,178 


731,530 


352,685 


48.20 


1950 


640,000 


1,341 


858,140 


477,5€8 


55.60 


1951 


735,000 


1,331 


978,375 


523,358 


53.50 


1952 


735,000 


1,222 


898,090 


448,582 


49.90 


1953 


674,000 


1,235 


832,305 


447,076 


53.70 


1954 


686,000 


1,204 


889,490 


483,003 


54.30 


1955 


653,000 


1,499 


978,775 


520,845 


53.20 


1956 


579,000 


1,661 


961,495 


496,324 


51.60 


1957 


443,000 


1,469 


650,780 


358,442 


55.10 


1958=-=- 


428,000 


1,717 


735,000 


426,511 


58.00 



=■= Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. Crop Reporting Service. 
Preliminary for 1958. 



19 



North Carolina Burley Crops 1928-1958 



Year 


No. Acres 


Yield Per 

Acre 
(Pounds) 


Production 
(1,000 lbs.) 


Value 
(1,000 Dollars) 


Average 
Price 


1928 


3,600 


650 


2,340 


$ 690 


$29.50 


1929 


5,500 


730 


4,015 


863 


21.50 


1930 


7,200 


750 


5,400 


853 


15.80 


1931 


7,100 


710 


5,041 


464 


9.20 


1932 


6,500 


735 


4,778 


726 


15.20 


1933 


9,200 


785 


7,222 


715 


9.90 


1934 


5,500 


870 


4,785 


809 


17.50 


1935 


5,200 


925 


4,810 


1,025 


21.30 


1936 


6,000 


900 


5,400 


2,095 


38.80 


1937 


9,000 


975 


8,775 


1,787 


21.40 


1938 


8,600 


900 


7,740 


1,308 


16.90 


1939 


8,100 


1,070 


8,667 


1,447 


16.70 


1940 


6,500 


1,050 


6,825 


1,242 


18.20 


1941 


6,200 


1,075 


6,665 


2,093 


31.40 


1942 


6,600 


1,150 


7,590 


3,211 


42.30 


1943 


8,500 


1,225 


10,412 


5,102 


49.00 


1944 


12,000 


1,390 


16,680 


8,157 


48.90 


1945 


13,000 


1,500 


19,500 


7,568 


38.30 


1946 


9,800 


1,475 


14,455 


5,999 


41.50 


1947 


9,600 


1,560 


14,976 


6,335 


42.30 


1948 


1C,300 


1,680 


17,304 


8,012 


46.30 


1949 


10,800 


1,440 


15,552 


6,750 


43.40 


1950 


10,500 


1,700 


17,850 


9,175 


51.40 


1951 


12,200 


1,750 


21,350 


11,572 


54.20 


1952 


12,000 


1,680 


20,160 


9,818 


48.70 


1953 


11,400 


1,800 


20,520 


11,019 


53.70 


1954 


12,700 


1,920 


24,384 


12,680 


52.00 


1955 


9,800 


1,900 


18,620 


10,651 


57.20 


1956 


9,400 


1,850 


17,390 


10,747 


61.80 


1957 


9,600 


1,975 


18,960 


11,073 


58.40 


1958^'=- 


9,400 


2,000 


18,800 


12,220 


65.00 



* Source: N. C. and U. S. D. A. Crop Reporting Service. 
** Estimate of Division of Markets based on producer sales. 



20 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allot-ments' 

1959 



County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Alamance 1,443 

Alexander 975 

Anson 271 

Beaufort 2,527 

Bertie 1,804 

Bladen 3,422 

Brunswick 1,819 

Cabarrus 1 

Caldwell 268 

Camden 2 

Carteret 418 

Caswell 1,958 

Catawba 4 

Chatham 1,113 

Chowan 198 

Cleveland - 1 

Columbus 5,242 

Craven 1,844 

Cumberland 2,499 

Dare 1 

Davidson 1,815 

Davie 812 

Duplin ' . . 4,644 

Durham 1,034 

Edgecombe 1,610 

Forsyth 2,226 

Franklin 2,777 

Gaston 1 

Gates 126 

Granville 2,122 

Greene 1,246 

Guilford 3,203 

Halifax 2,285 

Harnett 3,723 

Hertford 1,038 

Hoke 882 

Iredell 806 

Johnston 5,582 

Jones 937 

Lee 1,324 



21 



4,700 


37 


1,387 


50 


394 


61 


9,517 


21 


5,646 


32 


7,401 


28 


3,280 


42 


1 


72 


477 


59 


5 


66 


1,338 


51 


9,129 


22 


5 


65 


2,950 


46 


543 


58 


1 


70 


16,374 


7 


8,475 


24 


5,238 


34 


1 


71 


3,259 


44 


1,170 


53 


15,431 


8 


3,819 


39 


11,438 


16 


4,919 


35 


11,351 


18 


5 


67 


268 


62 


13,258 


13 


11,911 


15 


9,128 


23 


5,867 


31 


14,393 


11 


3,247 


45 


2,551 


47 


1,218 


52 


22,592 


2 


5,390 


33 


4,092 


38 



N. C. Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 
1959-Continued 

County No. Farms Acres Rank 

Lenoir 

Martin 

Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New Hanover 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pamlico 

Pender 

Person 

Pitt 

Randolph 

Richmond :' 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stokes 

Surry 

Tyrrell 

Vance 

Wake . : 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Yadkin 

121,768 470,299 1-72 

'■'■'■ Source: USD A Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



1,925 


13,852 


12 


1,565 


8,428 


25 


1 


1 


69 


430 


962 


56 


1,683 


4,870 


36 


3,067 


18,021 


5 


90 


215 


63 


223 


469 


60 


1,907 


6,222 


29 


933 


3,292 


40 


435 


1,093 


55 


1,728 


3,261 


43 


1,796 


9,571 


20 


2,724 


25,147 


1 


1,623 


3,283 


41 


1,046 


2,078 


48 


4,867 


20,572 


3 


3,092 


12,975 


14 


36 


47 


64 


5,454 


15,180 


9 


550 


1,153 


54 


2,787 


11,402 


17 


3,233 


10,865 


19 


2 


2 


68 


1,488 


8,090 


26 


3,902 


19,278 


4 


1,986 


6,084 


30 


296 


955 


57 j 


3,091 


14,473 


10 


979 


1,539 


49 ■ 1 


2,113 


16,741 


6 ! 


2,713 


8,009 


27 



22 



N. C. Burley Tobacco AllotTnents' 

1959 



County No. Farms Acres Rank 



Alleghany 484 

Ashe 2,422 

Avery 246 

Brunswick 1 

Buncombe 3,023 

Burke 11 

Caldwell 24 

Catawba 4 

Cherokee 176 

Clay 196 

Cleveland 9 

Davidson 3 

Gaston 1 

Graham 704 

Granville 1 

Haywood 2.010 

Henderson 116 

Iredell 4 

Jackson 312 

Lincoln 2 

McDowell 83 

Macon 224 

Madison 2,976 

Mitchell 944 

Polk 6 

Randolph 1 

Rutherford 67 

Stokes 2 

Surry 8 

Swain 219 

Transylvania 66 

Watauga 1,607 

Wilkes 24 

Yadkin 1 

Yancey 1,885 

17,862 



=•= Source: USDA Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation. 



218 


9 


1,110 


5 


113 


11 


1 


34 


1,644 


2 


4 


22 


10 


20 


1 


26 


64 


15 


82 


12 


3 


23 


1 


27 


1 


30 


343 


8 


1 


34 


1.141 


3 


47 


16 


2 


25 


121 


10 


1 


33 


27 


19 


68 


14 


2,568 


1 


515 


7 


1 


24 


1 


31 


30 


18 


1 


32 


1 


29 


70 


13 


32 


17 


798 


6 


4 


21 


1 


28 


1,138 


4 


10,163 


1-34 



23 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouses 
And Operators by Beits and Markets 

1958 

N. C. BORDER BELT 

Chadbourn (one set buyers) 

Producers — A. E. & Jack Garrett 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. D. Hendley 
Green-Teachey— Charlie Teacher, J. C. Green 

Clarkton (one set buyers) 

Bright Leaf— J. H. Bryant, B. F. Rivenbark 
New Bladen— Talley Bros., Bob Dale 
Clarkton Whse.— O. C. Blanchard, Gib Buck 

Fair Bluff (one set buyers) 

Powell— A. H. Powell & Sons 
Planters — N. N. Love, Carl Meares 
Littleton's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Littleton 

Fairmont (four sets buyers) 

Big- 5 — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 
Peoples — E. J. Chambers, Yarboro & Garrett Co. 
Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 
Mitchell-Davis — F. A. Davis, Harry & Jack Mitchell 
Frye No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday 
Planters No. 1 & 2— G. R. Royster 
Square Deal 1-2-3— W. G. Bassett 

Star Carolina 1-2-3— C. A. Blankenship, W. M. Puckett 
Twin State 1-2-3— P. R. Floyd, Jr., Paul Wilson 
Liberty — F. P. Joyce, Joe Pell 

Fayetteville (one set buyers) 

Big Farmers 1 & 2 — Harold Perkins, P. L. Campbell 
Planters — J. W. Stephenson, J. C. Adams 

Lumberton (three sets buyers) 

Carolina — M. A. Roycroft, J. L. Towsend, J. Johnson 
Smith-Dixie — Furman Biggs, Sr. & Jr. 
Hedgepeth — R. A. Hedgepeth, R. L. Rollins 
Liberty — R. E. Wilkens, R. H. Livermore 
Star, Inc. — Hogan Teater, D. T. Stephenson 
Lumberton Cooperative — C. E. McLaurin, Mgr. 

Tabor City (one set buyers) 

Carolina — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
New Farmers — R. C. Coleman, Mrs. Harriet Sikes 
Planters — Don Watson, Mgr. 

24 



Whiteville (three sets buyers) 

Big- Dixie — E. L. & Tommy Dudley 

Crutchfield— G. E. & R. W. Crutchfield, Blair Motley, Jr. 

Lea's No. 1 & 2 — William Townes Lea, Louie Price 

Moores— A. H. Moore, C. C. Mason, C. F. Jeffcoat 

Nelson's No. 1 & 2 — John H. Nelson 

Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 

Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Columbus County — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Carolina — Ralph C. Stephens, Lucien Stephens 

Liberty — J. W. Hooks, Carl Bryan 

EASTERN BELT 

Ahoskie (one set buyers) 

Basnight— No. 1-2-3— L. L. Wilkens, H. G. Veazey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. M. Odom, Pierce & Winborne 

Clinton (one set buyers) 

Carolina — Mrs. McWhorter Hamilton, L. D. Herring, C. J. Strickland 

Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Farmers — H. A. Carr, J. A. Chesnut, J. J. Hill 

Dunn (one set buyers) 

Big 4 Warehouse — R. D. & J. M. Smothers 
Planters — King Roberts & Clayton 

Farmville (two sets buyers) 

Bell's— Mrs. L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey 
Farmers — John N. Fountain, Mgr. 
Monk's No. 1 & 2 — John N. Fountain 
Planters — Chester W^orthington 
Prewits— B. S. Correll & C. Prewitt 

Goldsboro (one set buyers) 

Carolina — S. G. Best, Bruce Smith 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— S. B. Hill, Carl Holloman, J. F. Hill 

Littleton— O. L. Littleton, H. C. Whitley 

Big Brick — J. R. Musgrave 

Victory — Jim Hopewell & Richard Gray 

Greenville (five sets buyers) 

Cannon's — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 

Farmers — J. A. Tripp 

Planters — E. B. Jones 

McGowan's No. 1 & 2— C. H. McGowan 

Morton's — Elbert Bennett 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McGowan 

New Independent — Bob Cullipher, F. L. Blount 

Star— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 



25 



Greenville — Cont'd. 

Victory — Yock Joyner 

Raynor & Harris — C. C. Harris, James W. Reavis 

Keels— L. W. Edwards 

Harris & Rogers — R. E. Rogers 

Kinston (four full sets buyers — fifth set incomplete) 
Central — J. E. Jones, W. I. Herring 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins 

Kinston Cooperative 1 & 2 — D. W. Hodges, Mgr. 
Knott Warehouse, Inc. — K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 
Knotts New— H. G. Knott, W. E. Brewer 
New Dixie — John Jenkins, Mgr. 
Sheppard No. 1 & 2— R. E. Sheppard 
New Central — W. I. Herring, Bill King 
The Star Warehouses — C. J. Herring- 
Banner— K. W. Loftin, Mgr. 

Robersonville (one set buyers) 

Adkins & Bailey— I. M. Little. R. K. Adkins 

New Red. Front— J. H. Gray, J. W. Peay 

Planters No. 1 & 2— H. T. Highsmith, E. G. Anderson 

Rocky Mount (four sets buyers) 

Cobb & Carlton No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, J. C. Carlton 

Mangum — Roy M. Phipps 

Planters No. 1-2-3— W. B. Faulkner, Mgr. 

Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 

Works Warehouse — R. J. Works & Son 

Easley Warehouse Co., Inc. — H. A. Easley, Mgr. 

Farmers Warehouse, Inc. — J. C. Holt Evans, Mgr. 

Fenners — J. B. Fenner 

Smithfield (two sets buyers) 
Big Planters — J. B. Wooten 

Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. Kennedy, H. L. Doughtery 
Gold Leaf No. 1 & 2— R. A. Pearce 
Perkins Riverside— N. L. Perkins 
Wallace No. 1 & 2 — Lawrence and Dixon Wallace 
Skinner's — Frank Skinner 

Tarboro (one set buyers) 

Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2 — W. L. House, J. P. Bunn 
Victory No. 1 & 2— Cliff Weeks, W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (one set buyers) 

Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H. Farrior 
Hussey No. 1 & 3— G. D. Bennett, Joe Bryant 
Sheffield's— Garland & John Sheffield 



26 






Washington (one set buyers) 

Sermons No. 1 & 2 — W. J. Sermons, J. E. Roberson, Harry McMuUin 
Hassell-Edwards 1 & 2— M. M. Hassell, W. S. Edwards 
Farmers Whse. Inc. — Jack Douglas 

Wendell (two sets buyers) 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Central — Stephenson Bros. 

Planters — Mule Webb 

Liberty 1 & 2— H. F. Harris, I. D. Medlin, J. W. Dale 

Northside — G. Dean 

Wilson (five sets buyers) 

Big Dixie — E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thompson 

Wainwright — G. L. Wainwright 

Center Brick No. 1-2-3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 

Farmers — J. J. Gibbons, S. G. Deans 

Growers Cooperative — S. E. Griffin, Mgr. 

New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. & W. C. Smith, B. W. Carr 

Smith Warehouse, Inc., A B & C — H. H. Harris, Jr., Mgr. 

Watson — U. H. Cozart, Jr., Pres. 

Clark's— C. R. & Boyd Clark 

New Liberty — Carl B. Renfro 

Williamston (one set buyers) 

Carolina 1 & 2— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Farmer— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters — Urbin Rogers, Russell Rogers 
Roanoke-Dixie — J. W. Gurkin, Langley 

Windsor (one set buyers) 

Planters 1 & 2— C. B. & B. U. Griffin, J. D. & Charles Marshall 
Heckstall— E. D. Wiggins, Mack Hux 

MIDDLE BELT 

Aberdeen (one set buyers) 

New Aberdeen— George Mabe, Tom Faulkner 
Planters — W. Fentriss Phillips 
Hardee's — Hugh T. Hai'dee 

Carthage (one set buyers) 

McConnells — G. Hoover Carter 
Victory — R. L. Commer & Earl Ennis 

Durham — (three sets buyers) 

Liberty — John Walker Stone 

Roycroft— H. T., M. A. & J. K. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 

Star-Brick — A. L. Carver, Cozart, Currin 

Farmers — J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 

Planters— J. M. Talley, Howard Talley, Bob Dale, Sam Mangum 



27 



EUerbe (one set buyers) 
Farmers — D. B. Harris 
Richmond County — L. T. (Dutch) Harney 

Fuquay-Varina (two sets buyers) 
Big Top— Bill Talley 
New Deal— W. M., A. R., A. L. Talley 
Southside — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 
Goldleaf— R. H. Barbour, Sherrill Akins 
Liberty — P. L. Campbell 

Henderson (two sets buyers) 

Banners— E. C. Huff, L. B. Wilkinson 
Carolina— M. S. High, F. V. Hicks 
Moore's Big Henderson — A. H. Moore 
Farmers — W. J. Alston 
High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner 
Liberty — George T. Robertson 
Ellington— F. H. Ellington & Sons 

Louisburg (one set buyers) 

Big Franklin— A. N. Wilson, S. T. & H. B. Cottrell 
Southside A & B— Charlie Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 



Oxford (two sets buyers) 

Banner— W. L. Mitchell, Jr., David Mitchell 

Mangum-Farmers — T. B. Williams, Julian Adcock, S. B. Knott, Joe Cutts 

Fleming No. 1 & 2— G. B. Watkins, D. T. Currin, H. G. Taylor 

Planters— C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 

Johnson— C. R. Watkins, J. R. & S. J. Watkins 

Owens No. 1 & 2 — J. S. Watkins, L. Gregory 

Granville — L. S. Bryan, W. W. Yeargin 

Sanford (one set buyers) 

Big Sanford 1 & 2— C. W. Puckett 
Wood 3-W No. 1 & 2— W. F. Wood 
Twin City 1 & 2— W. M. Carter, T. V. Mansfield 

Warrenton (one set buyers) 
Boyd's — W. P. Burwell 
Center No. 1 & 2— M. D. Carroll 
Currin's No. 1 & 2— D. G. Currin, C. W. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 
Thompson — C. E. Thompson 

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OLD BELT 

Burlington (one set buyers) 

Carolina— W. B. Davis & R. D. Tickle 

Coble — N. C. Newman, L. O. Winstead, R. W. Rainey 

Farmers — Jule Allen, Bill & Jack McCauley 

Greensboro (one set buyers) 

Greensboro Tobacco Warehouse Co. — R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 
Guilford County Whse. Co.— H. P. Smothers, W. B. Hull 

Madison (one set buyers) 

New Brick— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Carolina— R. T. Chilton, S. F. Webster 
Sharp & Smith— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 
Farmers— W. S. Smith, H. A. Fagg 

Mebane (one set buyers) 

Twin States 1 & 2 — Roy Smith & Bud Rummage 
Planters— J. G. McCray, J. B. Keck 
Piedmont — Joe W. Dillard 

Ml. Airy (one set buyers) 

New Dixie 1 & 2 & Virginia Carolina — Oscar L. Badgett 
Liberty — R. C. Simmons, Jr., F. V. Dearmin 
Planters & Jones — Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 
Lovills-Hunters — J. W., J. L. Hunter 

Reidsville (one set buyers) 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Watts— A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pennix 
Smothers— T. B. & J. M. Smothers 

Roxboro (one set buyers) 

Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 
Hyco— W. R. Jones, F. J. Hester, Geo. Walker 
Foacre — H. W. Winstead, Jr. 
Planters No. 1 & 2— T. 0. Pass 
Winstead— T. T. & Elmo Mitchell 
Pioneer— J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 

Stoneville (one set buyers) 

Brown's No. 1 & 2—0. P. Joyce 

Farmers — F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 

Piedmont — J. J. Webster 

Slate No. 1 & 2— F. A. Brown, P. M. Moorfield 

Powell — J. J. Webster 



29 



Winston-Salem (four sets buyers) 

Brown — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson, H. M. Bouldin 
Carolina-Star — G. H. Robertson 

Growers— Floyd Joyce, W. G. Sheets, J. R. Pell, M. M. Joyner 
Glenn Co.— C. T. Glenn, D. L. Harris, Chas. Dalton 
Pepper No. 1 & 2 — Fred Owens, F. L. Kellam 
Planters — Foss Smithdeal, Frank Smithdeal, Wes Watson 
Taylor— Paul Taylor 
Big Winston— R. T. & J. F. Carter 

Cooks No. 1 & 2— B. E. Cook, C. B. Strickland, William Fowler, H. A. 
Thomas 

N. C. BURLEY BELT 

Asheville (two sets buyers — second set incomplete) 
Carolina — Max Roberts, Mgr. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart 
Bernard-Walker Warehouses — James E. Walker, Mgr. 
Big Burley— J. C. Adams, L. J. Hill 
Day's — Charlie Day 

Boone (one set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2 — Joe E. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — Joe E. Coleman 

West Jefferson (one set buyers) 

Tri-State Burley— C. C. Taylor, Rex Taylor 
Jarrell's — Bill Jarrell 



30 






Domestic Cigarette Consumption 
By Kinds— 1958 




Total Domestic Consumption 424 Billion Cigarettes